Smile when your heart is aching

25. Xicana. X-ray Tech. Tea, wine and beer lover. I grew tough skin this last year and am now stronger and happier than ever. Tucson raised and ready for a new life. Oh the excitement! This is a personal blog of expression...
Doesnt need no got damn filter! This was yesterdays sunset. #az #sunset #branches #harshaw

Doesnt need no got damn filter! This was yesterdays sunset. #az #sunset #branches #harshaw

When looking here, it’s hard to tell where heaven starts and the earth begins! Great photo Lily Jo! #forrestgumpquote #harshaw #az #myworld #myheaven #ilovemyfamily

When looking here, it’s hard to tell where heaven starts and the earth begins! Great photo Lily Jo! #forrestgumpquote #harshaw #az #myworld #myheaven #ilovemyfamily

queeniman:

zerostatereflex:

Fertilization

A beautifully done animation on how you became you.

See the full video here as I left out some really cool parts.

From 300 or so million down to ONE.

YOU. MADE. IT.

Edit:
Let’s think about this for a moment. The US population is roughly 330 million human beings. For the purposes of demonstration, take almost the ENTIRE POPULATION OF THE US and put them on the west coast, packed as tightly as possible. You’re just chillin, somewhere south of Pasadena let’s say, trying to get free, sweating and hungry with a desire you’ve never experienced before. You know you’re going to die though you think you’ll be the one to make it.

Then like the ULTIMATE hunger games of GENETIC WIN you traverse across the country desperately trying to get to the goal with absolute disregard for the other 299 million people. Your mom, dad, brother, sister, grandma, everyone you’ve ever known dies. You somehow get to the end. Where you bust through a gated base only to be sealed in and combined with another human to make a brand NEW human.

300,000,000 and you’re the only survivor. And your prize is to essentially die and reconstitute into a new being.

That’s awesome.

wow

(via chubby--bunny)

Home alone. Fam bam is out of town. Bf is working. Have to pack. Going to have Rhoda make me dinner tonight to make me feel better #lonley #bummed #hungry #imakethisfacewhenimlonleybummedandhungry #whatamidoingwithmylife

Home alone. Fam bam is out of town. Bf is working. Have to pack. Going to have Rhoda make me dinner tonight to make me feel better #lonley #bummed #hungry #imakethisfacewhenimlonleybummedandhungry #whatamidoingwithmylife

thenext3years:

emt-monster:

This is an x-ray of a 79 yo man who had lost weight and was being evaluated for swallowing difficulties. During the process of having him rapidly swallow barium (dense element that allows one to visualize structures), he aspirated the barium into his lungs. This led to respiratory failure.
The x-ray showed barium into both right and left main stem bronchi in the left upper and lower lobes. The barium spread to the smaller airways which produced the tree-in-bud appearance (arrow). This patient had the barium suctioned out (as much as possible), but he developed shock, his heart stopped beating and he suffered severe brain injury. He died a short time later.
(Source: www.anatomybox.com)

Whilst barium studies are on the decrease these days, I think it emphasises the point very clearly that physicians shouldn’t request examinations so frequently as they do.
Whilst the complications and morbidity rates are generally quite low with radiological examinations, when they do go wrong the outcome is usually catastrophic.
Irradiating and putting substances into a patient should be the very last thing, not the first thing one tries.

What if he was my patient?

thenext3years:

emt-monster:

This is an x-ray of a 79 yo man who had lost weight and was being evaluated for swallowing difficulties. During the process of having him rapidly swallow barium (dense element that allows one to visualize structures), he aspirated the barium into his lungs. This led to respiratory failure.

The x-ray showed barium into both right and left main stem bronchi in the left upper and lower lobes. The barium spread to the smaller airways which produced the tree-in-bud appearance (arrow).
This patient had the barium suctioned out (as much as possible), but he developed shock, his heart stopped beating and he suffered severe brain injury. He died a short time later.

(Source: www.anatomybox.com)

Whilst barium studies are on the decrease these days, I think it emphasises the point very clearly that physicians shouldn’t request examinations so frequently as they do.

Whilst the complications and morbidity rates are generally quite low with radiological examinations, when they do go wrong the outcome is usually catastrophic.

Irradiating and putting substances into a patient should be the very last thing, not the first thing one tries.

What if he was my patient?